Essential Equipment of Ophthalmology

Slit Lamp 

slit lamp is a device consisting of a high-intensity light source that can shine a thin beam of light into the patient's eye. The lamp allows for examining the human eye's anterior and posterior segments, including the eyelid, conjunctiva, sclera, natural crystalline lens, iris, and cornea. The slit-lamp examination provides a magnified view of the eye in detail, enabling diagnoses to be made for various eye conditions. A smaller, hand-held lens is used to examine the retina.

 

Goldmann tonometer

Considered the Gold standard according to the AAO, a Goldmann is attached to a slit lamp and provides accurate and reproducible readings. Using a prism measures the force needed to flatten a 3.06mm diameter circle of the central cornea.

 

Non-Contact tonometer (NCT)

Also referred to as an "air puff" tonometer, it is a diagnostic tool used by eye care professionals to measure the intraocular pressure (IOP) inside a patient's eyes. A non-contact tonometer uses a small puff of air to measure the eyes pressure. An industry term for this is also called a "puff test."  

 

Autorefractor/Keratometer (ARK)

A computer-based instrument is used to help determine the eyeglasses prescription. The Keratometer is a device used to determine the curve of the cornea. These measurements are typically taken on patients who are being fitted for contact lenses or who may have corneal problems.

 

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) 

An instrument that takes transpupillary images of the retina to assist in diagnosing and treating retinal diseases.

 

Visual Field Machine (HFA)

The visual field is how wide an eye can see when focused on a central point. Visual field testing is one way an ophthalmologist measures how much vision there is in either eye or vision loss over time.

Visual field testing can determine if there are blind spots (scotoma) in a patient's vision and where they are. A scotoma's size and shape can indicate how eye disease, or a brain disorder affects one's vision. For example, this test shows any possible side (peripheral) vision loss from this disease with glaucoma.

Ophthalmologists also use visual field tests to assess how vision may be limited by eyelid problems such as ptosis and droopy eyelids.

 

Fundus Camera 

A fundus camera is a low-power microscope attached to a digital camera used to examine structures such as the retina, optic disc, and lens.

 

Topographer (Topo)

Corneal topography is a computer-assisted diagnostic tool that creates a 3D image of the cornea's surface curve. The cornea is responsible for approximately 70% of the focusing power of the eye. An eye with good vision has an evenly curved cornea, but if the cornea is too flat or too steep, the vision will be less than perfect. The most significant advantage of corneal topography is the ability to detect rare conditions invisible to conventional testing.

 

Biometer/A-Scan (Ultrasound)

A-scan ultrasound biometry, commonly known as an A-scan, is a diagnostic test used in ophthalmology. An A-scan provides data on the eye's length, which is used to screen for sight disorders. One of the A-scan uses in determining the eye's size for calculating intraocular lens power for cataract surgery. 

 

Phacoemulsification Machine (Phaco)

Phacoemulsification is a modern cataract procedure in which the eye's lens is emulsified with an ultrasonic handpiece and aspirated from the eye. Fluids are replaced with irrigation of salt solution to maintain the anterior chamber. This procedure is also now performed with a femtosecond laser.  

 

Green (532nm), Red(810nm), and Yellow(577nm) lasers 

The most commonly employed wavelength in vitreoretinal practice is 532 nm green, widely referred to as an Argon Laser, and is used for treating retinal pathologies with pan-retinal photocoagulation. The 577 nm yellow laser is slightly absorbed by xanthophylls and well absorbed by oxygenated hemoglobin, making it the laser of choice for lesions near the macula. Good results with dye lasers operating at this wavelength have been reported.1 Krypton lasers producing the 647 nm red wavelength have historically been used for photocoagulation of deep choroidal pathology.

YAG laser  

YAG lasers are used to treat posterior capsular opacification, a condition that sometimes occurs after cataract surgery. These lasers can also be used for peripheral iridotomy in patients with acute angle-closure glaucoma, which has superseded surgical iridectomy.

SLT Laser 

Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) is a procedure that reduces intraocular pressure in patients suffering from glaucoma. The laser is applied using a unique contact lens to the eye's drainage system, where it stimulates a biochemical change that improves the outflow of fluid from the eye. An SLT laser is one of the lowest powered lasers used in Ophthalmology.  

Surgical Microscope

The human eye is a delicate organ, so performing surgery requires monitoring progress on a microscopic level. Surgical microscopes are designed to provide high contrast imaging of all parts of the human eye. When choosing an ophthalmic microscope, it is essential to pay attention to the type of optics employed. An apochromatic lens (or apo) will provide high light transmission, permitting high-quality imaging at lower light intensities. Specific models of ophthalmic surgery microscope provide multiple lighting options, such as switching between halogen and xenon. An ophthalmic surgical microscope can either be fixed or adjustable, and some models offer a second "observer" set of binoculars, some of which can independently adjust the focusing mechanism. Most ophthalmic microscopes are mounted to a rolling stand for versatility and to allow movement around the OR. However, ceiling-mounted microscopes also exist.

Conclusion

Laser Locators specializes in the preventative maintenance and refurbishment of all types of ophthalmic lasers and diagnostics. Whether you are only looking to service an existing device or want to take your practice to the next level, think of us first.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how you can improve your ophthalmic practice.
joey@laserlocators.com
by Joey Colarulo, Vice President

About Joey Colarulo

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.

Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth, including the development of a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.

Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.

Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.

Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards.

Clip-On vs. Integrated – 532nm Green Argon Laser

Uses and History

For years Green lasers have been the surgeon's favorite for retinal photocoagulation. We have seen advances in technology throughout our industry, making the lasers smaller, faster, easier to use, and more affordable. The photocoagulator has been a part of Ophthalmology since the 1950s. The xenon arc lamp photocoagulator produced a bright white light that closely mimicked sunlight, and it became commercially available in 1956. This device revolutionized the treatment of various retinal disorders and became an indispensable tool in the armamentarium of retinal specialists worldwide.

The argon laser emits blue-green wavelengths absorbed by the red hemoglobin in the blood and the cells under the retina. These wavelengths can pass through the fluid inside the eye without causing damage. For this reason, the argon laser is used extensively in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. The argon laser can burn and seal the leaking blood vessels, also known as photocoagulation.

The argon laser can also treat Macular degeneration. In this procedure, the laser destroys abnormal blood vessels so that hemorrhage or scarring will not damage central vision.

Integrated 532nm Green Laser

Clip-On 532nm Green Laser

The clip-on style of green lasers has many benefits. First of all, they are smaller and more compact than an integrated laser since they attach to your existing slit lamp. Second, a member of your team, with the proper training and experience, can relocate the laser to a different office if needed. Lastly, since this clip-on style of the laser will be used in conjunction with an existing piece of equipment, the cost is typically less than that of an integrated laser.

While all these features have their benefits, clip-on lasers are not perfect. The fact that it is a moveable device also means that it needs calibration more often than a stationary system. Also, lasers need time to acclimate to changes in temperature or humidity. If traveling from office to office exposes the device to different climates, the laser's performance may vary.

Conclusion

Laser Locators specializes in the preventative maintenance and refurbishment of all types of ophthalmic lasers and diagnostics. Whether you are only looking to service an existing device or want to take your practice to the next level, think of us first.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how you can improve your ophthalmic practice.

joey@laserlocators.com
by Joey Colarulo, Vice President

About Joey Colarulo linkedin button Clip On vs. Integrated   532nm Green Argon Laser

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.

Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth, including the development of a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.

Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.

Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.

Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards.

Phaco Machines in Ophthalmology

Definition

Phacoemulsification surgery is a procedure in which a device is used to remove a cataract from the eye to improve vision. The insertion of an IOL typically follows this procedure.

While speaking within the industry, this procedure is commonly referred to as "phaco."

Purpose

Phacoemulsification, or phaco, is used to restore vision in patients whose lens has become cloudy. In the early stage of a cataract, people may notice slight cloudiness since it only affects a tiny portion of the lens. When the cataract grows, the vision becomes cloudier. As vision gradually gets worse, the doctor will recommend surgery, typically phaco, to restore vision. With advancements in cataract procedures such as the Inter-Ocular Lens, patients can experience incredible vision improvement.

Description

Phacoemulsification is a type of extracapsular cataract extraction, a procedure that involves removing the lens and the front portion of the capsule. The old extracapsular extraction method involves a long incision, about 0.4 inches (10mm), or about half of the eye. Recovery from the large incision extracapsular extraction requires almost a week-long hospital stay and limited activity for several weeks.

Charles Kelman created phacoemulsification in the 1960s. His primary goal was to remove the cataract with a small incision, less pain, and shortened recovery time. He found that a cataract could be broken up into smaller pieces using an ultrasonic tip. At first, phaco wasn't very popular because it was a difficult skill to master. With the success rate and short recovery time, surgeons gradually adopted the procedure. Over the years, surgeons have refined phaco to make it safer. Innovations in technology like the foldable IOL have helped improve success rates by allowing surgeons to make much smaller incisions.

Most surgeons have a preferred technique; however, they might vary due to the cataract's density and size. Some surgeons

prefer to "chop," while others will divide and conquer the cataract before removal. Another procedure, called the "phaco flip", involves inverting and rotating the lens before removal.

Systems

Johnson & Johnson AMO COMPACT INTUITIV Phacoemulsification

The COMPACT INTUITIV System is designed to offer flexibility for your practice. The system has advanced, real-time chamber stability technology designed to maintain IOP and provide excellent control. Other features include small-bore, flexible tubing for superior control and exceptional chamber stability. The most impressive part of this model is its size. It is a tiny box weighing less than 60 lbs and has been known to be easily transported for mission trips, mobile surgery centers, and more.

Bausch & Lomb Stellaris PC

Surgeons seeking one system that can handle anterior, posterior, and combined procedures should consider the Bausch & Lomb Stellaris PC System. The system's advanced lighting and tapered valved cannulas will make the most challenging vitrectomy procedures much more comfortable.

The Stellaris PC system provides a high-performance experience that demonstrates Bausch & Lomb's expertise in vitreoretinal surgery with the Stellaris phaco system's features.

The Stellaris PC is a compact and mobile unit with a full suite of surgical packs and instruments. It is a versatile platform that allows surgeons the flexibility to perform different procedures while saving valuable time. Some of the later model Stellaris PCs can also have a 532nm green laser built inside the system as an additional feature.

Alcon Centurion Vision System

The CENTURION sets a high standard of performance in cataract surgery by combining multiple phaco technologies and other key features, including:

Active Fluidics Technology, an automatic system that optimizes anterior chamber stability by enabling users to proactively set and maintain intraocular pressure (IOP) within the eye during the cataract removal.

Balanced Energy Technology improves efficiency through Ozil Intelligent Phaco and the INTREPID Balanced Tip probes. This increases control while reducing energy levels and allowing the surgeon to adjust settings for aspiration and vacuum by keeping the lens material's fragments at the shearing plane during the emulsification.

Applied Integration is a cutting-edge design that enables the new system to be seamlessly integrated with multiple cataract surgical technologies, like Alcon's LuxOR Surgical Microscopes with Q-VUE 3-D assistant and the LenSx Laser to create a comprehensive cataract surgery suite designed to minimize variability at every step of the procedure.

Laser Locators specializes in the preventative maintenance and refurbishment of all types of phaco systems. Whether you are only looking to service an existing device or want to take your practice to the next level, think of us first.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how you can improve your ophthalmic practice.

joey@laserlocators.com

by Joey Colarulo, Vice President

About Joey Colarulo linkedin button Phaco Machines in Ophthalmology

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.

Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth, including the development of a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.

Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.

Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.

Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards.

The YAG Laser as used in Ophthalmology

Laser technology has revolutionized many fields. In ophthalmology, laser systems are used to photocoagulate, cut, remove, and stretch eye tissues. New types of lasers and applications continue to develop. This article will focus on the Nd: YAG laser and its role in treating ophthalmic disorders.

The first LASER was constructed in 1960 at Huges Research Laboratories.  LASER stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emissions of Radiation. A laser contains material that releases photons. This process amplifies, so the emitted photons are in phase and produce monochromatic coherent high-intensity polarized light. The power modulates by altering the energy or time (P = E/t). Q-switching and mode-locking refer to increasing laser power methods using shutters that synchronize the light phase, compressing output in time.

The Nd: YAG laser is a unique solid-state laser that utilizes a neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet crystal as the medium. It is pumped with a lamp or diode and commonly emits infrared light at 1064nm. It can be used in either a continuous or pulsed mode. Pulsing YAG lasers are typically Q-switched to achieve high-intensity pulses, which can be frequency doubled to emit the light at 532nm.

There are a variety of ophthalmic applications for YAG lasers. They are commonly used to treat posterior capsular opacification following cataract surgery. YAG laser can be used to create a peripheral iridotomy for patients with angle-closure glaucoma. Panretinal photocoagulation can be performed with frequency-doubled YAG lasers. A couple of other applications include the treatment of recurrent corneal erosions and vitreous floaters.

A more detailed description of some of these procedures follows:

Posterior capsulotomy: When a patient has a significant posterior capsular opacity or "secondary cataract," a YAG laser is often used to open the posterior capsule centrally. Patients are pretreated with iopidine or Alphagan-P to prevent an IOP spike. Then under topical anesthesia, the laser treatment is performed with a slit-lamp delivery system using an appropriate contact lens (i.e., Abraham capsulotomy YAG lens) to stabilize the eye and focus the laser beam. The energy setting depends on the capsular opacification density, but the specific starting point is 1-2mJ, and the energy is titrating according to the tissue response. The YAG laser causes photodisruption with the shock wave traveling anteriorly. Therefore, most lasers have a focus offset control to allow the surgeon to place the laser beam posterior (up to 250 microns) to the HeNe beam focus point on the capsule. This process helps prevent the intraocular lens (IOL) from pitting. Most surgeons will also place the initial laser spots off-center to avoid inadvertently damaging the IOL near the visual axis.

Anterior capsulotomy: The YAG laser is also utilizing to cut the capsule in other conditions. Capsular block syndrome occurs when there is retained viscoelastic in the capsular bag behind the IOL. This process causes a myopic shift and is evident on slit-lamp examination as an apparent space between the posterior IOL surface and the posterior capsule. A YAG laser uses this to puncture the anterior capsule peripheral to the IOL optic to allow the trapped material to drain. Alternatively, a posterior capsulotomy can be created to achieve the same result. Anterior capsular contraction syndrome or capsular phimosis may occur with a small capsulorhexis. Making radial anterior capsulotomies with a YAG laser effectively treats this condition.

Peripheral iridotomy: Lasers have long replaced surgical iridectomies for the treatment of angle-closure glaucoma. This non-invasive laser procedure is performed prophylactically in eyes with narrow or occludable angles. The laser energy needed ranges from 4-10mJ depending on the iris thickness. This laser creates an iridotomy more efficiently than a green laser. A peripheral iridotomy could also be beneficial in pigmentary glaucoma. 

Vitreolysis: YAG lasers are commonly used to treat aphakic and pseudophakic malignant glaucoma. YAG Laser vitreolysis can also be performed on strands of incarcerated vitreous in the anterior chamber that cause cystoid macular edema. Straightforward, thin vitreous wicks may be challenging to lyse, so it is best to pretreat with pilocarpine to induce miosis, stretch the incarcerated vitreous, and then use bursts 5-10mJ aimed at a pigmented area of the strand or near the wound. A change in the pupil shape back to round indicates successful vitreolysis.

ZEISS Visulas III 

The ZEISS VISULAS YAG III laser brings together optical experience, technological excellence, and an understanding of clinical applications. It is supremely focused, yet gentle cutting action has earned the device its reputation as the "sensitive scalpel" amongst secondary cataract lasers.

The high-precision Super-Gaussian beam of the VISULAS YAG III focuses on the optimum amount of energy onto the point of treatment. This process allows successful disruption to take place at just 2.5 mJ in air. In turn, this will enable you to offer precise treatment to your patients using a minimal amount of laser energy. The pulse frequency of 2.5 Hz also facilitates a fast workflow and short treatment times. 

The Fine adjustment of energy Offering twenty-two levels of energy attenuation, the VISULAS YAG III provides ample flexibility for various treatment techniques. The subtle gradations at the low end of the output range allow optimum laser energy regulation for your patients' minimally invasive treatment. 

The variable focus shift sets the focal point of the aiming beam precisely before, behind, or directly at the laser's focal point. Thanks to this safety feature, damage to the tissue and intraocular lens is now also a thing of the past. This process means greater comfort for your patients. 

 

Nidek YC-1800 YAG laser

Nidek YC1800

The Japanese company, NIDEK, also offered a YAG laser called the YC-1800. This ophthalmic photodisruptor provides the latest in innovative laser delivery and technologies. Simple operation and ultra adjustability make the YC-1800 YAG Laser system one of the best on the market. A few of the feature’s user praise is the high-resolution optics for hitting the exact laser-treatment location. The S-Switch allows easy changes of the parameters while holding the joystick, and the system is efficiently upgrading to the YAG/Green Combo system. 

Portable & User-Friendly Design

The "S-Switch" located on the joystick offers high operability, allowing doctors to change parameters while holding the joystick.

It also permits faster and easier operation and eliminates the need to pull away from oculars to make adjustments.

One-Touch Lock

The YC-1800 can effortlessly slide back and forth around the unit and can be fixed and released anywhere you like with the one-touch lock, offering improved safety.

Compact Design

The YC-1800 is Nidek's lightest ophthalmic photodisruptor, which can be easily transported. The compact design also allows greater flexibility in locating your armrest, which improves ergonomics.

Versatile Combo Laser

The YC-1800 can be paired with NIDEK's Green Laser Photocoagulator, allowing for the treatment of a broader range of patients.

Reliability and Safety

The YC-1800 has the new technology to control the pulse number under the CPU "D-Pulse," providing higher stability against environmental conditions.

 

 

Ellex Ultra Q

Uniquely efficient

A very efficient and fast microsurgical YAG laser, Ultra Q's unique cavity design allows you to perform capsulotomy and iridotomy procedures at more efficient power levels and with greater consistency.

IOL-friendly photodisruption

With an Ultra Gaussian beam profile, Ultra Q focuses more energy into the center of the beam profile — reducing the energy needed to perform capsulotomy and iridotomy effectively. 

Iridotomy for Phakic IOLs

Ultra Q enables you to perform precise iridotomy to prevent pupillary block before inserting a refractive IOL. The aperture must be large enough to guarantee a balanced aqueous flow without allowing light to transmit back to the pupil. Ultra Q's efficiency means that you can achieve this outcome in a single shot.

Ellex also offers a laser that is unique to the market, which is the Ultra Q Reflex. This laser is specifically designed for treating Vitreous Floaters. The effectiveness of Laser Floater Treatment (LFT) has been transformed through the development of Ellex's Reflex™ Technology platform, which includes TCI™ for on- and off-axis visualization, a precise aiming beam, and a superior energy beam profile — all within a unique slit lamp illumination tower with a mechanical prism design that converges and focuses your sightline, target illumination, and treatment beam into one optical path.

 

Conclusion

Laser Locators specializes in the preventative maintenance and refurbishment of all types of ophthalmic lasers, not just YAGs. Whether you are only looking to service an existing laser or want to take your practice to the next level, think of us first. 

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how you can improve your ophthalmic practice.

Sales@laserlocators.com

by Joey Colarulo, Vice President

About Joey Colarulo linkedin button The YAG Laser as used in Ophthalmology

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.

Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth, including the development of a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.

Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.

Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.

Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards.

The History of the OCT

Optical Coherence Tomography, or 'OCT', is a technique for obtaining sub-surface images of opaque materials at a resolution equivalent to a low-power microscope. It is effectively optical ultrasound imaging from within tissue to provide cross-sectional images.

Ocular (or ophthalmic) OCT is used by ophthalmologists and Optometrists to obtain high-resolution images of the retina and anterior segment. OCT's capability to show cross-sections of tissue layers with micrometer resolution provides a straightforward method of assessing cellular organization,  axonal thickness in glaucomamacular degeneration,diabetic macular edemamultiple sclerosis and other eye diseases or systemic pathologies which have ocular signs. Additionally, ophthalmologists leverage OCT to assess the vascular health of the retina via a technique called OCT angiography (OCTA).

Although the first OCT instruments became commercially available in 1996, clinical adoption was slow, and in 1999 only a total of ∼180 units were sold. A second generation instrument with improved ergonomics was introduced in 2000, but in 2001 only 400 instruments were sold. Concurrent with this, John Moore left Humphrey Zeiss, and the new management was considering abandoning OCT. Fortunately, Zeiss continued development, and the third generation instrument, Stratus OCT, was introduced in 2002. Stratus OCT had a similar resolution, but faster speeds of 400 A-scans per second, increasing image pixel density and quality. The technical, clinical, and market knowledge gained from the AOD prototype, Zeiss OCT1 and OCT2 systems, combined with the advances of Stratus OCT, drove OCT to become an essential clinical tool, with utilization and sales growing dramatically. By 2004, the estimated number of cumulative OCT imaging procedures worldwide surpassed 10 million.

Current Day OCTs 

While the Stratus is still widely used in the field, the newer Cirrus is the most popular OCT today and for a good reason. 

Cirrus 400 - the Basic

The ZEISS Cirrus OCT 400 is focused on the essential core OCT functionality at a very reasonable price point. Live OCT Fundus technology generates the fundus image using the OCT scanner only, rather than a line scanning ophthalmoscope. Both the Models 400 and 4000 offer the same features of glaucoma and retina analyses and are capable of (limited) anterior segment imaging.

CIRRUS OCT Model 400 shares the same modern integrated design, ease of use, and small footprint as the premium performance model 4000.

CIRRUS 400 captures a tightly packed, detail-rich cube of data in just seconds and allows you to visualize and analyze your patient's condition. Because the cube is populated with such high-density data, you can explore pathologies without requiring other scan patterns.

Cirrus 4000 - A Step Up

The ZEISS Cirrus HD-OCT 4000 enables examining the posterior and anterior of the eye at an extremely fine spatial scale. Surgical biopsy or contact with the eye is not needed. The Cirrus HD-OCT builds on the retinal imaging technology first introduced by ZEISS with the Stratus.

Utilizing the advanced imaging technology of spectral-domain OCT allows for 27,000 A-scans per second and better resolution than first-generation OCT technology. Cirrus acquires whole blocks of OCT image data, composed of hundreds of scans, in about the same time as Stratus acquires a six-line scan. You can view this data in three planes, or through three dimensions, giving you access to an extensive amount of retinal images in one scan.

Cirrus HD-OCT Model 500 & 5000 - Power and Performance

Advancing Smart OCT

ZEISS Cirrus HD-OCT is an advanced and smart OCT technology that offers state of the art retinal care. By using 3D microvascular visualization and non-invasive technology, Cirrus HD-OCT will improve your practice's quality of services and efficiency. It features cutting-edge visualization, tracking, and assessment tools to enhance your level of care.

The Cirrus HD-OCT is a clinical assessment tool that features industry-defining advancements. These are a few points to note on what the Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCTs has to offer.

The Cirrus HD-OCT Model 5000 has a feature called FastTrac, which is retina-tracking technology. Even while you are performing the OCT scan, the FastTrac system is tracking the retina.

The Cirrus HD-OCT 500 doesn't include FastTrac but includes a much faster scanner than previous systems, making it much easier to align a patient into the machine for accurate imaging.

What are the features of the Cirrus HD-OCT?

Innovative assessment options

Up to six progression maps are compared during analysis, with areas experiencing statistically significant change being color-coded for easier analysis. Along with the trend analysis of the rate of change, this assessment aspect will assist you in documenting macular and ONH/RNFL data to address and monitor glaucoma in your patients.

Patient-friendly Eye Tracking

Cirrus HD-OCT features Fastrack, which will reduce eye motion and increase focus on the same location over multiple visits. The single-pass alignment scanning and scan acquisition strategy allows Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT to focus on an exact area. You will be able to track your patient's progress better, thanks to this feature.

Multiple visualizations for improved analysis

The Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT offers the ability to analyze a single pathology through multiple views. This ensures a comprehensive analysis of a patient's condition, allowing you to identify and diagnose problems. You can view data from multiple angles due to the revolutionary 3-D imaging, advanced visualization, and fundus images. It also focuses on millions of data points and B-scans to image even the smallest pathology area.

 

Why Cirrus HD-OCT will improve your practice

Comprehensive data analysis

The multiple aspects of data presentation, including 3D imaging, advanced visualization, and OCT fundus imaging, allow for a comprehensive analysis of a patient's condition. You will be better able to monitor your patients, which will allow for more accurate results.

Ease of operation

These models are easy to use, even without a high skill level. It is designed for smart scans and reports to reduce the workload on your team. This allows for better workflow and efficient delivery of services since clinicians can operate it with minimal technical skill.

3D rendering

The 3D rendering provided by Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT allows you to view multiple angles for better data assessment. It pairs with the auto center function for increased accuracy. 

Topcon OCTs

The Topcon 3D OCT-1 replaced the earlier model OCT 2000. The Topcon 3D OCT-1 Maestro System offers clinical utility by combining a high resolution non-mydriatic retinal camera with the Spectral Domain OCT technology. The touch screen and fully automated (alignment, focus, and capture) operation make the 3D OCT-1 Maestro a great diagnostic device for even the smallest practice. PinPoint Registration technology indicates the location of the OCT image within the fundus image.

The Topcon 3D OCT-1 replaced the earlier model OCT 2000. 

Heidelberg Spectralis OCT

An upgradeable ophthalmic diagnostic imaging device, the SPECTRALIS system combines scanning lase imaging with high-resolution OCT. A variety of imaging modules allow the system to perform ultra-widefield imaging along with laser angiography. The Glaucoma Premium Edition assess the optic nerve, the retinal nerve fiber, and the ganglion cells, and the AutoRescan feature monitors change over time. MultiColor Scanning Imaging uses three laser wavelengths to display distinct retina patterns not visible via conventional fundus photography. BluePeak is a scanning laser fundus imaging mode that maps metabolic stress in the retina using lipofuscin. The Widefield Imaging Module provides a 55-degree view for all SPECTRALIS fundus and OCT imaging modalities. The OCT2 module brings together fast scan speeds and TruTrack Eye Tracking to produce high-quality images. Scanning Laser Angiography can be executed using either fluorescein or ICG dye to capture high-resolution images and blood vessel videos. Both angiography modes can be used with the Ultra-Widefield Angiography Module that can capture single-shot images, even in the periphery.

 The Spectralis OCT is sold new in various configurations, which makes the used market very confusing once they are available as refurbished. We do our due diligence to ensure you know exactly what you are buying when a refurbished Spectralis OCT is offered by our company.  

We sell and service all types of OCTs. Please contact us for a complete consultative session should you need to buy, service, or repair an OCT. sales@laserlocators.com

About Joey Colarulo linkedin button The History of the OCT

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.

Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth, including the development of a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.

Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.

Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.

Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards.