About ASCRS

Since 1974, ASCRS has led anterior segment surgical advancements through educational programs, publications, and on-line resources throughout the Ophthalmic industry. They are the primary source of up-to-date clinical information, published research, and regulatory information affecting anterior segment surgeons and the patients they serve.

ASCRS empowers Anterior Segment Surgeons to improve the vision, outcomes and quality of life for their patients through innovative approaches to Education, Advocacy, and Philanthropy.

ASCRS is also responsible for the most exciting annual event in the ophthalmology community. The ASCRS Annual Meeting. This year’s meeting is being held here:

Mandalay Bay Convention Center
Las Vegas, Nevada
July 23-27, 2021

The Annual ASCRS is a peer-to-peer knowledge sharing event and considered by most to be the top conference in the industry. This meeting offers a wide variety of innovative learning formats for Ophthalmologists.

A select team from Laser Locators attends each ASCRS and AAO Annual Meeting. While attendees are shopping for new equipment, we can offer appraisals of their old equipment on the spot which helps them determine if the time is right to upgrade. We can also offer just some consultative advice if you need some guidance on not only which model may be a good fit for your practice, but also the overall market and sales data for that particular model laser as well as its competitors.

Over the past 17 years we have done business with hundreds if not thousands of Ophthalmologists across the world in over 100 countries. Since most of our clients don’t visit our facility, we also use major annual trade shows to come together, walk the floor, find our clients to shake hands (or fist bump these days) and just meet face to face. Especially after this past year, we are very much looking forward to seeing anyone we have done business with over the years and just catch up for a few minutes. While we have always used technology to embrace our customers, nothing can permanently replace a face to face “thank you”.

We are very excited to be attending the ASCRS Annual Meeting in Las Vegas and we hope to see you there!

Find all the information and register for the event here: ASCRS 2021 Annual Meeting Registration. If you can’t make it to the meeting this year, be sure to check out the ASCRS website for many useful tools and reference materials here: ASCRS Tools. A few of the tools they have include:

  • Post Refractive IOL Calculator
  • Barrett Toric Calculator
  • Barrett Rx Formula
  • Toric Results Calculator
  • Hill-RBF Calculator
  • Astigmatism Double Angle Plot Tool IOL Calculation Formula Analyzer
  • Corneal SIA Tool

Conclusion

Laser Locators specializes in the preventative maintenance and refurbishment of all types of ophthalmic lasers and diagnostics. Whether you are only looking to service an existing device or want to take your practice to the next level, think of us first.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how you can improve your ophthalmic practice.

joey@laserlocators.com
by Joey Colarulo, Vice President

 

About Joey Colarulo

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.

Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth,  including the development of a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.

Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.

Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.

Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards

Haag Streit History

History

The founders – Friedrich Hermann and Hermann Studer opened their first workshop in Berne, Switzerland, in 1858. The precision and reliability of their designs were soon acknowledged, and a working relationship with the University of Berne was formed. The company, now known as Haag-Streit, began supplying all of Switzerland with weather stations and, shortly after that, meteorological measuring networks.

Medical professionals at the university were also quick to recognize the opportunities of working with Haag-Streit. They opened the "Insel" Eye Clinic at the University Hospital more than 100 years ago, where they could demo the variety of instruments they could produce. The introduction of electricity to the clinics further boosted demand for the new devices.

The Early Years

An interest in technology, exceptional manufacturing, and cooperation with trusted doctors and scientists allowed for creating instruments that broadened the horizons.
The company's focus on ophthalmic instruments was led by Wilhelm Haag, starting in the 1930s. The premium products that have been manufactured ever since are constantly being improved and updated.
Haag-Streit has been refined over the years and has always been quick to implement cutting-edge technology and electronic instruments. These new engineering skills create intuitive software, like Eye Suite, and automate the manufacturing facilities. Today, Haag-Streit devices are available in 145 countries through a sales network of more than 60 distributors.

Present Day Haag Streit

Haag Streit Slit lamps

Since its introduction in 1958, the Goldmann slit lamp 900 has been popular because of its superior optics and longevity. As a result, more than 100,000 eye care professionals have purchased a Haag-Streit slit lamp. Based on the knowledge gained from this large user base, other slit lamps have been developed by Haag-Streit over the years. They all have the same high performance, durability, and longevity as their predecessor. All Haag-Streit slit lamps are manufactured for the highest quality requirements. The result is superb optics, allowing for accurate diagnostics, safe patient treatment, and stunning imaging results.
Since its launch more than 160 years ago, Haag-Streit has stood for high-precision mechanics. This experience, combined with outstanding Swiss engineering and the use of high-grade materials, ensures perfect mechanics in all our slit lamps, which can last for decades.
Perfection in design, materials, and construction allows all movements to be made smoothly and effortlessly without any wrist or finger strain – and to continue doing so for the very long lifetime of a Haag-Streit slit lamp.

Conclusion

Laser Locators specializes in the preventative maintenance and refurbishment of all types of ophthalmic lasers and diagnostics. Whether you are only looking to service an existing device or want to take your practice to the next level, think of us first.
Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how you can improve your ophthalmic practice.

joey@laserlocators.com
by Joey Colarulo, Vice President

About Joey Colarulo

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.
Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth, including developing a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.
Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.
Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.
Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards.

Essential Equipment of Ophthalmology

Slit Lamp 

slit lamp is a device consisting of a high-intensity light source that can shine a thin beam of light into the patient's eye. The lamp allows for examining the human eye's anterior and posterior segments, including the eyelid, conjunctiva, sclera, natural crystalline lens, iris, and cornea. The slit-lamp examination provides a magnified view of the eye in detail, enabling diagnoses to be made for various eye conditions. A smaller, hand-held lens is used to examine the retina.

 

Goldmann tonometer

Considered the Gold standard according to the AAO, a Goldmann is attached to a slit lamp and provides accurate and reproducible readings. Using a prism measures the force needed to flatten a 3.06mm diameter circle of the central cornea.

 

Non-Contact tonometer (NCT)

Also referred to as an "air puff" tonometer, it is a diagnostic tool used by eye care professionals to measure the intraocular pressure (IOP) inside a patient's eyes. A non-contact tonometer uses a small puff of air to measure the eyes pressure. An industry term for this is also called a "puff test."  

 

Autorefractor/Keratometer (ARK)

A computer-based instrument is used to help determine the eyeglasses prescription. The Keratometer is a device used to determine the curve of the cornea. These measurements are typically taken on patients who are being fitted for contact lenses or who may have corneal problems.

 

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) 

An instrument that takes transpupillary images of the retina to assist in diagnosing and treating retinal diseases.

 

Visual Field Machine (HFA)

The visual field is how wide an eye can see when focused on a central point. Visual field testing is one way an ophthalmologist measures how much vision there is in either eye or vision loss over time.

Visual field testing can determine if there are blind spots (scotoma) in a patient's vision and where they are. A scotoma's size and shape can indicate how eye disease, or a brain disorder affects one's vision. For example, this test shows any possible side (peripheral) vision loss from this disease with glaucoma.

Ophthalmologists also use visual field tests to assess how vision may be limited by eyelid problems such as ptosis and droopy eyelids.

 

Fundus Camera 

A fundus camera is a low-power microscope attached to a digital camera used to examine structures such as the retina, optic disc, and lens.

 

Topographer (Topo)

Corneal topography is a computer-assisted diagnostic tool that creates a 3D image of the cornea's surface curve. The cornea is responsible for approximately 70% of the focusing power of the eye. An eye with good vision has an evenly curved cornea, but if the cornea is too flat or too steep, the vision will be less than perfect. The most significant advantage of corneal topography is the ability to detect rare conditions invisible to conventional testing.

 

Biometer/A-Scan (Ultrasound)

A-scan ultrasound biometry, commonly known as an A-scan, is a diagnostic test used in ophthalmology. An A-scan provides data on the eye's length, which is used to screen for sight disorders. One of the A-scan uses in determining the eye's size for calculating intraocular lens power for cataract surgery. 

 

Phacoemulsification Machine (Phaco)

Phacoemulsification is a modern cataract procedure in which the eye's lens is emulsified with an ultrasonic handpiece and aspirated from the eye. Fluids are replaced with irrigation of salt solution to maintain the anterior chamber. This procedure is also now performed with a femtosecond laser.  

 

Green (532nm), Red(810nm), and Yellow(577nm) lasers 

The most commonly employed wavelength in vitreoretinal practice is 532 nm green, widely referred to as an Argon Laser, and is used for treating retinal pathologies with pan-retinal photocoagulation. The 577 nm yellow laser is slightly absorbed by xanthophylls and well absorbed by oxygenated hemoglobin, making it the laser of choice for lesions near the macula. Good results with dye lasers operating at this wavelength have been reported.1 Krypton lasers producing the 647 nm red wavelength have historically been used for photocoagulation of deep choroidal pathology.

YAG laser  

YAG lasers are used to treat posterior capsular opacification, a condition that sometimes occurs after cataract surgery. These lasers can also be used for peripheral iridotomy in patients with acute angle-closure glaucoma, which has superseded surgical iridectomy.

SLT Laser 

Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) is a procedure that reduces intraocular pressure in patients suffering from glaucoma. The laser is applied using a unique contact lens to the eye's drainage system, where it stimulates a biochemical change that improves the outflow of fluid from the eye. An SLT laser is one of the lowest powered lasers used in Ophthalmology.  

Surgical Microscope

The human eye is a delicate organ, so performing surgery requires monitoring progress on a microscopic level. Surgical microscopes are designed to provide high contrast imaging of all parts of the human eye. When choosing an ophthalmic microscope, it is essential to pay attention to the type of optics employed. An apochromatic lens (or apo) will provide high light transmission, permitting high-quality imaging at lower light intensities. Specific models of ophthalmic surgery microscope provide multiple lighting options, such as switching between halogen and xenon. An ophthalmic surgical microscope can either be fixed or adjustable, and some models offer a second "observer" set of binoculars, some of which can independently adjust the focusing mechanism. Most ophthalmic microscopes are mounted to a rolling stand for versatility and to allow movement around the OR. However, ceiling-mounted microscopes also exist.

Conclusion

Laser Locators specializes in the preventative maintenance and refurbishment of all types of ophthalmic lasers and diagnostics. Whether you are only looking to service an existing device or want to take your practice to the next level, think of us first.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how you can improve your ophthalmic practice.
joey@laserlocators.com
by Joey Colarulo, Vice President

About Joey Colarulo

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.

Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth, including the development of a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.

Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.

Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.

Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards.

Clip-On vs. Integrated – 532nm Green Argon Laser

Uses and History

For years Green lasers have been the surgeon's favorite for retinal photocoagulation. We have seen advances in technology throughout our industry, making the lasers smaller, faster, easier to use, and more affordable. The photocoagulator has been a part of Ophthalmology since the 1950s. The xenon arc lamp photocoagulator produced a bright white light that closely mimicked sunlight, and it became commercially available in 1956. This device revolutionized the treatment of various retinal disorders and became an indispensable tool in the armamentarium of retinal specialists worldwide.

The argon laser emits blue-green wavelengths absorbed by the red hemoglobin in the blood and the cells under the retina. These wavelengths can pass through the fluid inside the eye without causing damage. For this reason, the argon laser is used extensively in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. The argon laser can burn and seal the leaking blood vessels, also known as photocoagulation.

The argon laser can also treat Macular degeneration. In this procedure, the laser destroys abnormal blood vessels so that hemorrhage or scarring will not damage central vision.

Integrated 532nm Green Laser

Clip-On 532nm Green Laser

The clip-on style of green lasers has many benefits. First of all, they are smaller and more compact than an integrated laser since they attach to your existing slit lamp. Second, a member of your team, with the proper training and experience, can relocate the laser to a different office if needed. Lastly, since this clip-on style of the laser will be used in conjunction with an existing piece of equipment, the cost is typically less than that of an integrated laser.

While all these features have their benefits, clip-on lasers are not perfect. The fact that it is a moveable device also means that it needs calibration more often than a stationary system. Also, lasers need time to acclimate to changes in temperature or humidity. If traveling from office to office exposes the device to different climates, the laser's performance may vary.

Conclusion

Laser Locators specializes in the preventative maintenance and refurbishment of all types of ophthalmic lasers and diagnostics. Whether you are only looking to service an existing device or want to take your practice to the next level, think of us first.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how you can improve your ophthalmic practice.

joey@laserlocators.com
by Joey Colarulo, Vice President

About Joey Colarulo linkedin button Clip On vs. Integrated   532nm Green Argon Laser

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.

Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth, including the development of a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.

Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.

Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.

Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards.

Phaco Machines in Ophthalmology

Definition

Phacoemulsification surgery is a procedure in which a device is used to remove a cataract from the eye to improve vision. The insertion of an IOL typically follows this procedure.

While speaking within the industry, this procedure is commonly referred to as "phaco."

Purpose

Phacoemulsification, or phaco, is used to restore vision in patients whose lens has become cloudy. In the early stage of a cataract, people may notice slight cloudiness since it only affects a tiny portion of the lens. When the cataract grows, the vision becomes cloudier. As vision gradually gets worse, the doctor will recommend surgery, typically phaco, to restore vision. With advancements in cataract procedures such as the Inter-Ocular Lens, patients can experience incredible vision improvement.

Description

Phacoemulsification is a type of extracapsular cataract extraction, a procedure that involves removing the lens and the front portion of the capsule. The old extracapsular extraction method involves a long incision, about 0.4 inches (10mm), or about half of the eye. Recovery from the large incision extracapsular extraction requires almost a week-long hospital stay and limited activity for several weeks.

Charles Kelman created phacoemulsification in the 1960s. His primary goal was to remove the cataract with a small incision, less pain, and shortened recovery time. He found that a cataract could be broken up into smaller pieces using an ultrasonic tip. At first, phaco wasn't very popular because it was a difficult skill to master. With the success rate and short recovery time, surgeons gradually adopted the procedure. Over the years, surgeons have refined phaco to make it safer. Innovations in technology like the foldable IOL have helped improve success rates by allowing surgeons to make much smaller incisions.

Most surgeons have a preferred technique; however, they might vary due to the cataract's density and size. Some surgeons

prefer to "chop," while others will divide and conquer the cataract before removal. Another procedure, called the "phaco flip", involves inverting and rotating the lens before removal.

Systems

Johnson & Johnson AMO COMPACT INTUITIV Phacoemulsification

The COMPACT INTUITIV System is designed to offer flexibility for your practice. The system has advanced, real-time chamber stability technology designed to maintain IOP and provide excellent control. Other features include small-bore, flexible tubing for superior control and exceptional chamber stability. The most impressive part of this model is its size. It is a tiny box weighing less than 60 lbs and has been known to be easily transported for mission trips, mobile surgery centers, and more.

Bausch & Lomb Stellaris PC

Surgeons seeking one system that can handle anterior, posterior, and combined procedures should consider the Bausch & Lomb Stellaris PC System. The system's advanced lighting and tapered valved cannulas will make the most challenging vitrectomy procedures much more comfortable.

The Stellaris PC system provides a high-performance experience that demonstrates Bausch & Lomb's expertise in vitreoretinal surgery with the Stellaris phaco system's features.

The Stellaris PC is a compact and mobile unit with a full suite of surgical packs and instruments. It is a versatile platform that allows surgeons the flexibility to perform different procedures while saving valuable time. Some of the later model Stellaris PCs can also have a 532nm green laser built inside the system as an additional feature.

Alcon Centurion Vision System

The CENTURION sets a high standard of performance in cataract surgery by combining multiple phaco technologies and other key features, including:

Active Fluidics Technology, an automatic system that optimizes anterior chamber stability by enabling users to proactively set and maintain intraocular pressure (IOP) within the eye during the cataract removal.

Balanced Energy Technology improves efficiency through Ozil Intelligent Phaco and the INTREPID Balanced Tip probes. This increases control while reducing energy levels and allowing the surgeon to adjust settings for aspiration and vacuum by keeping the lens material's fragments at the shearing plane during the emulsification.

Applied Integration is a cutting-edge design that enables the new system to be seamlessly integrated with multiple cataract surgical technologies, like Alcon's LuxOR Surgical Microscopes with Q-VUE 3-D assistant and the LenSx Laser to create a comprehensive cataract surgery suite designed to minimize variability at every step of the procedure.

Laser Locators specializes in the preventative maintenance and refurbishment of all types of phaco systems. Whether you are only looking to service an existing device or want to take your practice to the next level, think of us first.

Contact us today for a complimentary consultation on how you can improve your ophthalmic practice.

joey@laserlocators.com

by Joey Colarulo, Vice President

About Joey Colarulo linkedin button Phaco Machines in Ophthalmology

Vice President

Joey has been the Vice President of Laser Locators since March 2015 and a Managing Partner since 2012. He joined the company in 2011.

Joey has significantly contributed to Laser Locators' growth, including the development of a full service and parts department. He has streamlined the sales and procurement departments by redeveloping processes and implementing new systems. Through Joey's efforts, Laser Locators has tripled its sales volume and added 13 new positions.

Joey has over 20 years of experience in global internet sales and marketing. His expertise in analyzing the marketplace and leverage the latest e-commerce technologies has enabled Joey to drive exponential sales growth year over year.

Originally from Philadelphia, Joey earned his Bachelor's degree in Financial Management and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rowan University.

Outside of work, Joey is involved in the Westchase Charitable Foundation, a local non-profit that provides direct assistance to those in need. His interests include vintage BMWs and rare sports cards.